IIPM Admission

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Meet Anjali Raj, 18, Madrasa Topper

IIPM Mumbai Campus

It irks Anjali Raj, 18, no end when someone pronounces Phulwari Sharief, the Anjali Raj, 18, Madrasa TopperPatna suburb where she lives, with seen (S) rather than sheen (Sh). In parts of eastern India, there’s no dearth of people who do so. In fact, after repeated attempts, she has barely managed to get her parents to pronounce Sharief right. Living in a society where people cannot differentiate between these alphabets, life is never easy. And under the circumstances, you cannot help but appreciate the teenager’s command on the language. The credit goes to her madrasa education.

An alumnus of Madrasa Imad-ul-Uloom Khankah-e-Imadia of Patna city, Anjali topped Fauqania (Matriculation) exams in the non-Muslim category with 805 marks out of 1200. And if that were not enough, she is also a CBSE matriculate. Incidentally, she has done well in both. And most of all, she has made her father, Ajay Raj, a businessman involved in the milk trade, really proud and happy. That we came all the way from Delhi to interview her daughter brought visible pride on his face. I am sure that happiness will last many a lifetime.

He says: “She has been interviewed by many journalists here. But now her popularity has reached Delhi too. I made it a point to teach her Urdu. And look what wonders it has done. It brought you all the way from Delhi.”

Phulwari Sharief is a Muslim majority neighbourhood. It is therefore natural that Ajay has lots of Muslim friends. He always wanted his daughter to study Arabic and Urdu. But he did not know the way to go about it. But then, one fine morning, Waiz-ud-Din Rahman, Urdu teacher at the school where Anjali used to study, advised Ajay to get his daughter admitted to a madrasa. He also insisted that it will help her in the Civil Services exams.

As things turned out, neither Anjali nor her mother appeared particularly enthusiastic. Anjali always wanted to speak Urdu as fluently as her friends and she had acquired a few basics too. But to read in a madrasa was a different ball game and she was not game for it. “I did not like it initially. In fact, I protested hard when papa took me to a madrasa. But as he was adamant I had no choice,” she says. The father offered her a way out. He said that she would continue studying in the CBSE board and attend a madrasa too.

The madrasa she got admitted in was 20 km from her home. Now that created another problem. Anjali was categorical that she would not let her studies suffer because of this. Rahman, her teacher, waived off compulsory attendance.

So how was the first day at the madrasa for a student of an English medium school? “It was all new for me. I was very scared and was looking for excuses for not attending the madrasa. Although I knew all the sums in mathematics, I could not attempt a single one because of the terminologies that were in Urdu. I had done really well in mathematics all along and here I was not able to do a simple sum. It was all so embarrassing,” recalls Anjali. In fact, when she came out, she broke down and made up her mind that she would not return.

But then, Rahman came to her rescue. He told her that these were initial hiccups. The carrot of the Civil Services was again dangled before her and Anjali finally complied. Since her madrasa was quite far she would attend classes just a couple of times in a month. Yet she managed to do well. There are people who question the very basis of how marks are doled out in madrasa and Sanskrit board exams.

But all the negative talk has not daunted Anjali one bit. She is now all set to take the Maulvi (intermediate) exams, one eye firmly on making it to the Civil Services.

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37 comments:

suri said...

Non-Muslim girls, mostly Hindus, are taking to madarsa education in Bihar these days. Many of them have done exceedingly well in the Urdu- medium examinations this year.

Thirty students in the Fauqania ( equivalent to matriculation) and sixteen students in the Maulvi ( intermediate), who have topped the examinations, belong to non- Muslim communities.

suri said...

mohd Mustafa Hussain Mansuri, secretary of the Bihar State Madarsa Examination Board ( BSMEB), said that non- Muslim candidates had performed very well in the Fauqania and Maulvi examinations the results of which were declared on Wednesday.

Among the non- Muslim students, Sanjay Kumar has secured the top position in the Maulvi examination having secured 893 out of the total of 1000 marks while amongst the girls Anjali Raj topped with 805 marks. It is the girls who have bagged the maximum number of top positions. Among the 12 non- Muslim students who secured high marks, ten are girls from Hindu families.

simran said...

She has been interviewed by many journalists here. But now her popularity has reached Delhi too. I made it a point to teach her Urdu. And look what wonders it has done. It brought you all the way from Delhi.”

pramod singh kandasi said...

I think Anjali raj is a brilliant student. I wish anjali future is bright.

simran said...

It was all so embarrassing,” recalls Anjali. In fact, when she came out, she broke down and made up her mind that she would not return.

vijay said...

IIPM was initially set up with an objective to undertake training programmes, consulting and additional research services for the ports and shipping industry.

harvinder said...

Thane, Raigad, Ratnagiri and Sindhudurg. The university offers Bachelors', Masters' and Doctoral degrees apart from Diplomas and Certificates in many disciplines.

pramod singh kandasi said...

anjili have secured top ranks in Class X (Fauquania) and XII (Maulvi) examinations conducted by the Bihar Madrassa Education Board this year. Anjali secured the first rank in Fauquania in the non-Muslim category. Similarly, Sanjay Kumar secured the first rank in Maulvi in the non-Muslim.

harvinder said...

Today, the university campuses serve as centres of administration and centres for higher education.

suri said...

Even tough there are some examples of successful professionals in different fields with Madarsa background; very few take Madarsa education as a route for their career. Most of the Indians in the Gulf countries learned the Arabic language at their work place in the host country.

vijay said...

IIIPM states that its infrastructure is cutting edge. According to IIPM, students learn the very latest in management techniques using the very best in equipment and teaching.

sujit said...

"I have made up my mind. I will encourage other Hindu students to opt for madrasa education, for it is inexpensive and enriching,"

Mukesh said...

Anjali Raj You are the pride of the country.

suri said...

MADARSA EDU SYSTEM is popular because,Revamped education system, modernized courses, hassle free admission procedures, nominal fee structure are some key factors which are attracting Hindus and others towards Madarsas. The most astonishing revelation is that plenty of job opportunities in the Gulf countries are regarded as one of the main factors which attract these non-Muslims to Madarsas. While some others think that Madarsa education will be helpful for them in obtaining jobs

mohit said...

This articles is good. its tells about the girl education.

subhash said...

The Indian Institute of Planning and Management, Mumbai played host to fifteen students from the Ingolstadt University, Ingolstadt Germany accompanied by Prof. Philip Siedel for a Student’s Exchange programme. These students, specializing on different aspects of management, have begun attending lectures with IIPM Mumbai students for four weeks beginning on 19th of February, 2007. The German Students would be attending the Fifth Trimester Sessions where they will be taught diverse subjects like Multinational Business Finance, Derivatives, and Economic Environment to Business, Applied Finance, Compensation Management, Strategic HR etc.

These students will not only be a part of the academic excellence at IIPM, but will also get the unique opportunity to experience the customs and culture of our country. IIPM Mumbai has also organized other learning activities to enhance their experience, such as, a training session on personality development and workshop on Indian culture.

Brijesh Chaudhuri said...

This article is vary interesting so we can achieve our goal of the life we should always fighting in every movement like as Anjali. Its learn more that we can do anything. If we have dare.

ANUP KUMAR said...

im 30 yrs old.now started leanrning. Since childhood very interested but could not get oppurtunity to learn.Now I got good guru.
I want to know whether age matters in learning study?
Sometimes i’am getting stuck in 3 beat(fast pace)
Do you suggest anything for improving the speed.

gaurav said...

Madrassa board officials say non-Muslims, particularly upper caste Brahmins in the Mithilanchal region of north Bihar, are keen on sending their children to madrassas to learn Arabic, Persian, Islamic traditions along with other modern subjects with an eye on jobs in the Gulf and in the embassies of Muslim nations.

pramod singh kandasi said...

Anjali Raj topped with 805 marks. It is the girls who have bagged the maximum number of top positions. Among the 12 non- Muslim students who secured high marks, ten are girls from Hindu families. I want to congratulate anjail raj success.

preeti said...

congratulation anjali raj, you have done very good job........
i want to wish you for your in future life.......................
all the best.................

preeti said...

Maulana Ajaj Ahmad, chairman of the Madrassa Education Board of Bihar, told IANS: 'Non-Muslims, particularly Hindu boys and girls in large numbers, are studying in different madrassas across the state. It is a positive development as their enrolment is increasing every year.'

ANUP KUMAR said...

To change ur behavior, u have to change ur attitude first.

ANUP KUMAR said...

There may be only a handful of hindus studying in madrasas, in Bihar. because, it happens only in Bihar. because it is Bihar.
but, more than 83% of muslims study in most of the educational institutions run by hindus.

ANUP KUMAR said...

When Hindus open schools, they keep it open for all by default. They neither prevent non-Hindus from learning any courses nor do they use it for their ad campaign.

It's considered so common that for ages, those who were converted to Islam by force/sex always went to Hindu schools. These are no more referred as Hindu school and are recoznised as Regular" or "Normal" schools.

On the other hand, eyerything that Muslims do is hyped up by Media speacially Rediff to potray a good decent image of Islam which is in stark contrast to its teachings and followers. Now these "Mad rassas" are funded by terrorists and arabs thro Money Laundering.

Time is ripe to kick these terror outfits out of Bharat and make the Teaching profession a noble profession, free of terror and religion.

preeti said...

a madrasa is a centre of Islamic ‘indoctrination’ where Muslims are caught young and put through the paces in preparation for a life that begins and ends with religion? Banish the thought forthwith. There is life beyond theology in the madrasas across India.

preeti said...

a madrasa is a centre of Islamic ‘indoctrination’ where Muslims are caught young and put through the paces in preparation for a life that begins and ends with religion? Banish the thought forthwith. There is life beyond theology in the madrasas across India.

preeti said...

a madrasa is a centre of Islamic ‘indoctrination’ where Muslims are caught young and put through the paces in preparation for a life that begins and ends with religion? Banish the thought forthwith. There is life beyond theology in the madrasas across India.

preeti said...

a madrasa is a centre of Islamic ‘indoctrination’ where Muslims are caught young and put through the paces in preparation for a life that begins and ends with religion? Banish the thought forthwith. There is life beyond theology in the madrasas across India.

preeti said...

a madrasa is a centre of Islamic ‘indoctrination’ where Muslims are caught young and put through the paces in preparation for a life that begins and ends with religion? Banish the thought forthwith. There is life beyond theology in the madrasas across India.

preeti said...

a madrasa is a centre of Islamic ‘indoctrination’ where Muslims are caught young and put through the paces in preparation for a life that begins and ends with religion? Banish the thought forthwith. There is life beyond theology in the madrasas across India.

preeti said...

a madrasa is a centre of Islamic ‘indoctrination’ where Muslims are caught young and put through the paces in preparation for a life that begins and ends with religion? Banish the thought forthwith. There is life beyond theology in the madrasas across India.

preeti said...

Ten non-Muslim students have secured top ranks in their respective exams. Bihar has over 4,000 madrasas, including 1118 state-run Islamic schools, 32 madrasas for girls under the government-aided category and 576 unaided institutions. Sceptics allege that non-Muslim students join madrasas because the examinations here are held without proper invigilation and no police force is ever deployed to keep a watch. The implication is that it is easier to resort to unfair means and score high marks.

preeti said...

Ten non-Muslim students have secured top ranks in their respective exams. Bihar has over 4,000 madrasas, including 1118 state-run Islamic schools, 32 madrasas for girls under the government-aided category and 576 unaided institutions. Sceptics allege that non-Muslim students join madrasas because the examinations here are held without proper invigilation and no police force is ever deployed to keep a watch. The implication is that it is easier to resort to unfair means and score high marks.

simran said...

She has been interviewed by many journalists here.

ANUP KUMAR said...

Anjali secured the first rank in Fauquania in the non-Muslim category. Similarly, Sanjay Kumar secured the first rank in Maulvi in the non-Muslim category.

"Anjali got 805 marks in the non-Muslim category, while another girl, Nasra Khatoon, got 896 marks to secure the first rank in exam in the Muslim category. Anjali's performance is amazing," said Bihar Madrassa Education Board's examination controller Mohammed Mustafa.

Anonymous said...

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